Surfer, 20, attacked by great white shark leaving leg ‘like hamburger meat’

A surfer who was attacked by a great white shark was left with his leg looking "like hamburger meat", according to his mum.

Cole Herrington, 20, was bitten while dangling his legs off his surfboard in Oregon, US.

The shark reportedly munched into his board and his lower left leg and dragged him beneath the water before letting him go.

He is now recovering from the ordeal on Sunday at a spot known as The Cove, south of the city of Seaside.

The attack left him with a cut which runs from his little toe to his heel and another on his calf.

His mum Amy Powell said it looks like the shark was letting go and scraped across his leg, the New York Post reports.

A photo of the surfboard shows it was left with bite marks.

She added: "It looks like hamburger meat. I think he’s still in shock.

"Cole said he didn’t even see the shark. All of a sudden, he was under the water. All of a sudden, the adrenaline kicked in.

"He doesn’t remember much of it."

The aspiring electrician was due to have surgery at a hospital in Portland, Oregon this week and is said to be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  • Shark attack survivor's 'excruciating pain' after swimming from 'all the blood in water'

A shark expert said the surfer, who was with two friends when the attack happened on Sunday, is lucky to be alive.

Peter Klimley, a former University of California professor, told The Oregonian: "That fella has a lot to be thankful for.

"If a shark really wanted to consume him, it could have. If they don’t want to release something, they don’t have to.

"This surfer was small and helpless in the mouth of the shark.

"The shark made a decision it didn’t want to eat him and let him go."

He said the terrifying predator was likely attracted by the movement of his surfboard.

But it would have released him after it realised the surfer was not a seal, he added.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to support the surfer, which has raised more than £5,000 so far.

Source: Read Full Article