New £1.4m supercar smashes speed record as it’s clocked at a whopping 315mph

A £1.4million super car has become the fastest motor in the world after it smashed the world record.

Named the SSC Tuatara, the American built machine clocked an eye-watering speed of 508km an hour – 315 miles per hour.

The staggering time makes it comfortably faster than the previous record set by the Bugatti Chiron Super Sport 300+, which was just 488km/h.

The Tuatara’s actual top speed was 532km/h, but the official record is made up of an average of two timed runs, one in each direction to account for wind resistance.

The mind boggling speed was clocked by British racing driver Oliver Webb who bravely got behind the wheel.

He rocketed down a track on his first run, hitting 301.07mph.

Turning in the other direction, he did not let his foot off the throttle until he was speeding at 331.mph.

The average speed of the two runs make the SSC Tuatara the fastest production vehicle on the planet.

The SSC, which is the brainchild of Jerod Shelby, was tested on a highway just outside Las Vegas.

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Shelby believes the car will be hard to beat.

He told News.com.au: “We came pretty close to meeting the theoretical numbers, which is astonishing to do in a real world setting on a public road.

“America’s new claim to victory in the ‘land-based space race’ is going to be tough to beat.”

Webb added: “There was definitely more in there. And with better conditions, I know we could have gone faster.

“As I approached 331mph, the Tuatara climbed almost 20mph, within the last five seconds. It was still pulling well. As I told Jerod, the car wasn’t running out of steam yet. The crosswinds are all that prevented us from realising the car’s limit.”

Extensive aerodynamics help keep drag to a minimum, making the top speed possible.

The car can be road tested by the general public, if they have a staggering £1.4million available to pay for the full aerodynamic pack.

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