Gruesome recent great white shark attacks as body washes up with missing parts

One of the sea's most fearsome creatures, the great white shark, is at it again.

The adult beasts can grow up to six meters in length and have rows of sharp teeth waiting to sink into their unfortunate prey.

They are believed to be responsible for a recent attack in South Africa, in which two swimmers were tragically killed.

A man's body washed up on La Lucia beach in Duran last week with chunks of his flesh missing. The body of a second man was also sighted but was swept away by currents.

A spokesperson for the country's emergency medical services said: "Reports indicate that while walking on the beach, a man came across the decomposing body of an adult male face down between washed-up flotsam.

"When medics turned the body over for assessments they found that a portion of the right upper arm and right chest were missing with multiple shark bites clearly visible."

Whether it was a great white responsible is not yet confirmed and police are investigating, but the sea predator has been responsible for a few attacks in recent years.

What are the worst great white shark attacks?

  • Fishermen catch huge shark only to discover it's been eaten alive by even bigger monster

There is a theory that the eyesight of the great white shark is so bad that they mistake humans for seals, which is why they attack.

Perhaps the most famous shark attack in history was the gruesome end of the USS Indianapolis during the Second World War.

After the ship was torpedoed in July 1945, just 316 of the 1,196 men on board survived the sinking and many were picked off by circling sharks, drawn to the scent of blood in the water.

Survivor Woody James said: "The sharks were around, hundreds of them… Everything would be quiet and then you'd hear somebody scream and you knew a shark had got him."

Great whites were not responsible for the deaths of the sailors, but have been behind several attacks in recent years.

Sydney shark attack

One of the worst great white shark attacks occurred in February 2022 in Australia, a hotspot for the species.

Great whites are the sharks most likely to attack a human and one unfortunate swimmer was killed when 13ft beast attacked in Little Bay Beach, Sydney.

British diving instructor Simon Nellist, 35, was viciously attacked and killed just 500 metres off the beach in front of horrified witnesses.

It was Sydney's first fatal attack for six years and haunting footage of the attack showed the swimmer screaming as he struggled to fend off the shark, before being dragged underwater.

One witness said: "'F**k man, I heard a scream and the shark was just chomping on his body and the body was in half just off the rocks here."

Fisherman Kris Linto witnessed the attack and said: "We heard a yell and turned around it looked like a car had landed in the water, a big splash then the shark was chomping at the body and there was blood everywhere."

California great white shark attack

The US has seen several attacks by great white sharks over the years and many have been fatal. Few have been more gruesome than the death of 39-year-old Francisco Javier Solorio Jr in 2012.

Surfer Solorio was killed when the left side of his upper body was bitten. His friend dragged him out of the water and tried to give him first aid, but it was no use.

The Santa Barbara Sheriff's Office said at the time: "The shark in this tragic incident has been positively identified as a 15- to 16-foot great white shark."

Can you survive an attack from a great white shark?

Despite the huge size of a great white shark and its awesome speed – they have been recorded as moving at 13 meters a second – they can be fought off.

In January 2014, 23-year-old Sean Pollard escaped an attack from two great whites, but lost his left arm and right hand in the devastating ordeal.

After somehow freeing himself, Pollard caught a wave back to shore in Esperance, Western Australia, where he was saved by passers-by.

He told 60 Minutes: "I felt this massive bump and the shark came underneath me. I was trying to paddle calmly so I wasn’t splashing around like I was panicking, but once it got directly behind me it charged. Went in for the kill.

"Both my arms were in its mouth, its eye was right there. That vision – this cover going over its eye as it bit down on me – [is] burnt into my mind. It took me underwater, started shaking its head. I remember having to hold my breath and it shook seven or eight times. That’s when I got bumped from behind by another shark."

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